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JobMaker Hiring Credit

Job losses have been extensive during the COVID-19 pandemic and the JobMaker Hiring Credit will give businesses incentives to take on additional employees aged between 16 and 35 years old.

Eligible employers will receive $200 a week for each new employee aged between 16 and 29. For new eligible employees aged 30 to 35, they’ll receive $100 a week. Businesses and employees will need to satisfy specific eligibility requirements.

For an employer to be eligible they must have an Australian Business Number and be up to date with their tax lodgement obligations, registered for Pay As You Go (PAYG), and be reporting through Single Touch Payroll. Employers will not be eligible if they are also claiming JobKeeper Payment.

To receive the JobMaker Hiring Credit, employers must also meet additionality criteria, requiring an increase in the:

The JobMaker Hiring Credit will be available to employers for each new job they create over the next 12 months for which they hire an eligible young person. The employee must work at least 20 paid hours per week on average and may be employed on a permanent, casual or fixed term basis. The employee must also have received the JobSeeker Payment, Youth Allowance or Parenting Payment for at least one of the three months preceding the time of hiring.

The JobMaker Hiring Credit will start on 7 October 2020. The Hiring Credit will be claimed quarterly in arrears by the employer from the Australian Tax Office (ATO) from 1 February 2021. Employers will need to report to the ATO quarterly that they meet the eligibility criteria.

Registrations will be open for eligible employers through ATO online services from 7 December 2020.

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Small businesses and mental health

Posted on October 22, 2020 by admin

Owning and running a small business often means that you are responsible for most or all of the tasks that need to be completed. Often, owners will find their time being entirely occupied with their business. This can take a toll on their mental health and cause work related stress. Which not only inhibits one’s ability to complete the duties of their role, but also puts them at greater risk of developing mental health conditions.

Keeping work hours in check

Although it is tempting to focus on your business at all times, this can prevent individuals from participating in other activities which are important for physical and mental health. Business owners may feel motivated and enthusiastic to put extra time into their work, however, long work hours have been associated with poorer mental health, fatigue, burnout, worry, and irritability.

Creating a work life balance by setting time limits on work hours might be a necessary precaution at the start. Taking breaks during the work day and setting time aside during the week will be extremely beneficial.

Accessing support

Running a small business can often be isolating as there is rarely someone to share concerns of the business with. This will mean that owners are dealing with all of the issues on their own.

Discussing issues that arise with family or close friends can help reduce the feeling of being isolated. Alternatively, there are groups of small business owners who, and business mentors who may be able to understand and relate to what owners are experiencing, and potentially provide relevant advice.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle

A healthy lifestyle can help individuals manage stress and work towards improved mental health. This will also improve the ability to focus and concentrate when working.

Developing good sleeping habits is a great way to kickstart this process. It can also be helpful to try different relaxation techniques such as meditation and exercise is an important start. Remember that this is a trial process, so trying different techniques to find the most effective one is essential.

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