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How Much Super Should You Have To Retire?

Retirement might seem like a far off dream for many in the workforce, but it’s never too early to start thinking about how much money you might require to live comfortably in your golden years.

Your super balance will most likely fund your retirement, so knowing how well it is performing at your current age is a critical way to address performance issues and optimise its path going forward. You want to make sure you’ll be getting the most out of your super so that when it comes to retiring, you can afford the lifestyle you want.

The amount of super that you may need to live comfortably during your retirement may depend on a range of factors, such as expenses that you may incur, outstanding debts you may have and whether you will be eligible for other types and forms of income (such as through investments, savings, an inheritance or the Age Pension).

According to figures set out in March 2021, those who are looking to retire today (regarding individuals and couples around the age of 65) would need an annual budget of around $44,412 or $62,828 to fund a comfortable lifestyle. For a modest lifestyle, they would need an annual budget of $28,254 or $40,829 respectively.

Everyone’s situation is different, and their super balance will likely reflect those differences.

Men and women may have different super balances due to pay gaps, salary differences and potentially the amount of time they have actually spent working (maternity leave, working part-time versus full-time etc, taking time off work for travel, etc.). As an example, a woman in the 20-24 age bracket may have an average super balance of $8,051, while a man in the same bracket is expected to have an average balance of $9,481. In the 40-44 age bracket, the average super balance for men is $134,992, while women in that same age group may only possess $98,572.

So how can you make certain that your superannuation gets the boost it needs to fund your retirement? We can suggest the following:

If you’re looking towards your future, and want more advice on how to plan for your retirement with regard to your superannuation, you can speak with us or your super provider.

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Changes To Employers & Super When Stapled Funds Come Into Effect 1 November 2021

Posted on September 20, 2021 by admin

This year has seen a lot of amendments and changes to the rules governing superannuation funds and their providers by the Federal Government that may have an impact on how you as an employer deal with super.

Are you aware of the changes to “choice of fund” rules that you might need to be aware of as an employer of new to the workforce employees?

Currently, as an employer, you may be paying contributions to your new employees into a  default superannuation fund of your choice if they have failed to provide you with their own choice of superannuation fund details. This may be due to not having a superannuation fund (as in, the employee is new to the workforce), or as a result of other circumstances.

As an employer, you must provide all new employees with a Superannuation standard choice form within 28 days of their start date. They may also be provided with one if:

If the employee holds a temporary working visa or their super fund undergoes a merger or acquisition, they will not be able to choose their super fund themselves.

From 1 November 2021, if you have new employees start and they don’t choose a specific super fund, you may need to request their ‘stapled super fund’ details from the Australian Taxation Office.

A stapled super fund is an existing account that is linked, or ‘stapled’ to an individual employee, so it follows them as they change jobs. This change aims to reduce the number of additional super accounts opened each time they start a new job. If a new employee does not have a stapled fund and they do not choose a fund, the employee’s super can be paid into the employer’s default fund.

With fewer superannuation funds being opened, employees are less likely to generate ‘lost super’ as they transition through their employment periods and various careers leading up to their retirement.

As an employer, you’ll be able to request stapled super fund details for new employees using the ATO’s Online services for business.

To get ready for this change, you can check and update the access levels of your business’ authorised representatives (such as your accountant or bookkeeper) in Online services. This will mean you’re ready to request stapled super funds if needed. It will also assist in protecting your employees’ personal information.

As an employer, you legally cannot provide your employees with recommendations or advice about super unless you are licensed by ASIC to provide financial advice. You can give your employees information about choosing a fund however, including:

Remember, registered tax agents and BAS agents like us can help you with your tax and super queries. Come and speak with us about your options, and to ensure that you are compliant with your super requirements as an employer.

If you are a new employee entering into the workforce, and you’d like to know more about your options when it comes to superannuation, you should have a serious discussion with providers and conduct your own independent research on the funds available.

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